News Links for: 2010

by Danny Sullivan | Search Engine Land
Google launched its Google Books Ngram Viewer this week, a tool that lets you research how popular words and phrases have been over several centuries, based on their appearance in books. But can you trust it? In the case of the F-word, no...
by Eric Schaffer | Live Science
Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology has taken their humanoid robot, HRP-4C, and pushed it even closer to human-ness by granting it the power to dance...
by George Heymont | The Huffington Post
While overt displays of intelligence can scare some people away, real and/or artificial intelligence are constant sources of fascination...
by Brian Palmer | The Washington Post
Even if you don't recognize the stilted robotic diction over the phone, they usually give themselves away when they can't understand a thing you're saying. But how long will it be before you have an entire conversation with a machine without realizing it?
by Massimiliano Versace and Ben Chandler | IEEE Spectrum
DARPA's new memristor-based approach to AI consists of a chip that mimics how neurons process information.
by Christof Koch and Giulio Tononi | IEEE Spectrum
An older article from June, 2008, but a good one.

"Our work has given us a unique perspective on what is arguably the most momentous issue in all of technology: whether consciousness will ever be artificially created."
by Alex "Sandy" Antunes | Science 2.0
"...couldn't you just say 'hey, look, that's the #$#%er that is shooting us?'"
by Alfred Thompson | blogs.msdn.com
...the root of the difficulty of programming artificial intelligence – you have to really understand the game and how to win at it...
by Lucas Laursen | IEEE Spectrum
PACO-PLUS project develops embodied cognition for robot learning...
by GeckoSystems Intl. Corp. | MarketWire.com
The first product of our joint activity with the American company GeckoSystems Intl. Corp. will be the house mobile robot, replacing medical workers which serve older persons in-home...
by Eric Bland | MSNBC.com
"Marge," the robot, can read, figure out mispelled words in strange lighting, and even learn from her reading...
by Daily Mail Reporter | Mail Online
One of Britain's first humanoid robots, built just after the Second World War, has been given a new lease of life after having languished in a garage for the past 45 years...
by Mike Anderson | NBC Bay Area
A Berkeley company may have made the coolest thing for paraplegics since the wheelchair...
by Thomas Hargrove | The Oakland Press
Federal authorities hope computers can sift through more than 60,000 unsolved homicides currently in ViCAP records, looking for common clues that would link one killer to multiple crimes...
by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute | NewsWise
"...the new 'Explicit-Implicit Interaction Theory,' recently introduced in an article in Psychological Review, could be used for future artificial intelligence..."
by Kate Shaw | Ars Technica
A pair of researchers has developed a new methodology that mimics natural conditions so that they can study fear in a more realistic way...
by MacGregor Campbell | NewScientist Magazine
Humans aren't the only ones who can steer a conversation to their own benefit. This year's winner of the Loebner prize for the most convincing chatbot used such a trick to fool a human judge...
by Gregory Mone | Popular Science Magazine
Steve Hassenplug and friends create a massive "Monsterchess" set from more than 100,000 Lego pieces and Lego Mindstorms kits. A touchscreen PC connects the entire board via Bluetooth and can tell up to seven pieces at a time where to move.
by Rachel Smith | USNews
Google revolutionized the way we search online. Now the internet giant is looking to revolutionize the way we drive...
by Jarod Lanier | New York Times
A philosophical commentary on how we view robots, computers and humans, and how this changing perception effects our culture.
by Kevin Parrish | Tom's Guide
"There are endless possibilities for what you and your new virtual friend, Alexandria, can do together," Eric G Productions stated. "Alexandria loves you, she is eager to please, and she will grow with your iPad. Before you know it, Alexandria will be your virtual best friend."
by Greg Tito | The Escapist Magazine
At the AI and Interactive Digital Entertainment (AIIDE) Conference held at Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA, this week, 28 bots submitted from all over the world competed against each other and an expert human opponent...
by James Temple | San Francisco Chronicle
Eric Horvitz's receptionist is one of the most advanced artificial intelligence programs in the world. The 21st century secretary underscores the breakthrough underway in AI and what becomes possible as computers learn to perceive...
by redOrbit | redOrbit
The UW researchers hypothesized that babies would be more likely to view the robot as a psychological being if they saw other friendly human beings socially interacting with it...
by Dan Nosowitz | Popular Science Magazine
At Carnegie Mellon University, one robotics student estimates that there are more robots than students in the department, but in a shameful display of mammalian arrogance, the precise number and type of said robots is unknown...
by Science Daily | Science Daily
"...ears have certain advantages over the more established biometrics as they have a rich and stable structure that is preserved from birth to old age."
[I suspect future facial recognition software will include ears, too]
Writer, John Horgan, disputes some scientist's claims about the future of artificial intelligence and the creation of artificial brains.
Large arrays of pressure sensors could lend a human sense of touch to robots and might someday form the basis of better prosthetics...
by Paul Marks | NewScientist Magazine
He has persuaded six male colleagues to let a powerful industrial robot repeatedly strike them on the arm, to assess human-robot pain thresholds..."We are taking the first steps to defining the limits of robots so they can safely interact with humans."
by Joan Naper | Northwestern University
.PDF: Stimulus award notice and official project description.
Professor Kristian Hammond talks about his project "Computational creativity: Building a model of machine-generated humor" on WTTW Chicago Tonight (September 2, 2010).
Interview with Stanford professor Daphne Koller on artificial intelligence, her research and where the field is going.
by Steve Lohr | The New York Times
...The computer was primed by the researchers with some basic knowledge in various categories and set loose on the Web with a mission to teach itself...
by James Temple | Seattle PI Blogs
Google Inc. was the talk of tech blogs over the weekend after the New York Times revealed the Internet giant has developed cars that can drive themselves...
by Sarah Kessler | Mashable
"These 10 comp-sci products caught our attention and spiked our cool meters..."
by Wired UK | Wired Magazine
Armed with a bow, an arrow, a cute (if politically incorrect) Native American headdress and a complicated computer algorithm, the robot learns from his missed shots iteratively, until he makes the bull's-eye...
by Lucas Laursen | Spectrum IEEE Magazine
Evil Intent? Laying hens sometimes peck their coop mates to death. Applying hidden Markov chains to a video feed of a flock can predict when hens will cause trouble...
by MacGregor Campbell | NewScientist Magazine
Got a spare $400,000 lying around? Forget buying a house and splash out on your own robot instead...
by Colin Barras | NewScientist Magazine
A robot toddler could have much to teach artificial intelligence (AI) researchers and psychologists alike, by providing a simplified non-human model for early child development...
by Science News | Science News
Designers of robot pets are fighting a never-ending battle with consumers to provide entertaining and realistic gadgets that respond to human interaction in ever more nuanced ways, mimicking the behavior of real pet animals or even people...
by John Markoff | The New York Times
Mobile robots are now being used in hundreds of hospitals nationwide as the eyes, ears and voices of doctors who cannot be there in person...
by Science Daily | Science Daily
...for those playing the games, it will mean the computer-controlled non-player characters (NPCs) will be smarter and more human-like in their behaviour...
by Richard Ingham | AFP
Biotech wizards have engineered electronic skin that can sense touch, in a major step towards next-generation robotics and prosthetic limbs...
by NBC News | MSNBC.com
Video: From factories to combat zones, domestic help to social companions, robots are becoming ubiquitous. Robotics and artificial intelligence experts give an update on where science is taking us...
by Morgan Bettex | MIT News
Team envisions robotic spacecraft that can explore hard-to-reach areas on the moon and other planetary bodies by hopping...
by Manufacturingtalk | manufacturingtalk.com
Robot cost reductions and the declining cost of overall turnkey systems coupled with the improving performance of robots has boosted North American robot usage growth...
by Jeremy Hsu | Live Science
In Robot Madness, LiveScience examines humanoid robots and cybernetic enhancement of humans, as well as the exciting and sometimes frightening convergence of it all...
Basketball seems like a simple game: project a ball through a round hoop. However, for Jacob Mason and Anne Hillebrand, it's a much more complicated task to program a robot to shoot and sink the basketball...
by Dave Shinsel | Dave Shinsel
Video: Watch as Loki the Robot navigates his creator's house on voice command. Dave Shinsel of Portland, Oregon created 40-pound Loki with two-dozen sensors and eleven servos, for under $2,000. Watch the videos, or visit www.dshinsel.com to see more of his robots.
by Cian O'Luanaigh | NewScientist Magazine
Seth Shostak of SETI argues that the artificially intelligent machines created by an alien life form may be easier to detect than the alien life forms themselves...
by Alok Jha | The Guardian
Nao, developed by a European research team, models the first years of life and can form bonds with the people he meets...
by The Economist | The Economist
In 1992, Dr. Dorigo and his group began developing Ant Colony Optimisation (ACO), an algorithm that looks for solutions to a problem by simulating a group of ants wandering over an area and laying down pheromones...
by Mail Online | Mail Online
Tony Ellis and his wife, Judie, do not have any children or animals at home - but with chatterbox robot Aimec following them around, there is never a dull moment...
by Tim Carmody | Wired Magazine
The researchers use multitouch to send the robots scurrying around to execute commands, but also to pan and zoom a map of where they’re operating...
by Priya Ganapati | Wired Magazine
Reverse-engineering the human brain so we can simulate it using computers may be just two decades away, says Ray Kurzweil...
by Alessandra Calderin | Popular Science Magazine
You're caught by the ocean's riptide, exhausted and barely keeping your head above water. Then your unlikely hero appears: a four-foot-long talking buoy. It's EMILY, the robot lifeguard...
by Nissan-Global.com | Nissan-Global.com
In 2009, fish-inspired technology takes center stage in Nissan's new "EPORO*1" robot car concept, which is designed to travel in a group, mimicking behavioral patterns of a school of fish avoiding obstacles without colliding with each other...
by The Associated Press | NewsOk
An Italian who lost his left forearm in a car crash was successfully linked to a robotic hand, allowing him to feel sensations in the artificial limb and control it with his thoughts...
by Anton Olsen | Wired Magazine
Inspiration video documentary by Trossen Robotics' intern, Jennero Rossi.
by NewScientist Magazine | NewScientist Magazine
Neurobiologists have developed an artificial bee eye, with a 280-degree field of vision, which should enable robots to see more of the world around them...
by Jordan Keenan | Motherboard
Eight sci-fi robots that prove that robots aren't going to enslave humanity...
The accelerating pace of technological progress means that our intelligent creations will soon eclipse us--and that their creations will eventually eclipse them...
by David Gelernter | Edge.org
The net grows at many million points simultaneously, like a living organism. It's only natural to wonder whether the internet will one day start to think for itself. Or is it thinking already?
by Richard Merritt | Duke University
As physician-guided robots routinely operate on patients at most major hospitals, the next generation robot could eliminate a surprising element from that scenario...
by Larry Hardesty | MIT News
Studded with magnets and electronic muscles known as actuators, a prototype robot developed at MIT can automatically fold itself into an airplane or an origami boat...
by Larry Hardesty | MIT News
An innovative control system allows a foam glider to touch down on a perch or a wire like a pet parakeet...
by PhysOrg.com | PhysOrg.com
Researchers at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain) are participating in a study to develop a system for evaluating sport performance through application of Artificial Intelligence techniques to automatically analyze the development of plays...
by Amy Harmon | The New York Times
Styled after a baby seal, a robot that blinks and coos when petted is often therapeutic for patients with dementia...
by Associated Press | YouTube
Video: A humanoid robot conducted a wedding ceremony in Tokyo on Sunday, May 16, 2010...
by Amy Harmon | The New York Times
Many roboticists believe that trying to simulate human appearance and behavior is a recipe for disappointment, because it raises unrealistic expectations. But Bina48's creator, David Hanson, argues that humanoid robots can make for genuine emotional companions...
by John Markoff | The New York Times
Impressed and alarmed by advances in artificial intelligence, a group of computer scientists is debating whether there should be limits on research that might lead to loss of human control over computer-based systems that carry a growing share of society's workload...
by Live Science | Live Science
Video of Dennis Hong's robotics lab.
by Science Daily | Science Daily
The study, part of an EU project to improve robot efficiency and usability, is intended to help develop robots that can adapt in the event of an 'injury'...
by Science Daily | Science Daily
Researchers at the UW and Stanford University have developed an insectlike robot with hundreds of tiny legs. Compared to other such robots, it excels in its ability to carry heavy loads -- more than seven times its own weight -- and move in any direction...
by Bristol Robotics Laboratory | Bristol Robotics Laboratory
a.k.a EcoBot-III, is powered by a stack of 48 Microbial Fuel Cells, which receive fresh digested nutrients from the artificial stomach...
by NewScientist | NewScientist
New computer software uses your laptop or smart phone's camera to see if anyone is looking over your shoulder at your private information...
by NewScientist | NewScientist
The Mars lander has lost its solar panels, leading NASA to declare it officially dead...
Inspired by how human infants learn by observing and imitating other people, we plan to have MERTZ be placed in a public venue for long periods of time...
by Steve G. Steinberg | .csv
Blogger's perspective on applications of A.I. in autonomous automobiles, risk compensation, insurance, accident theory, economic performativity, learning by reading, and man vs. Google.
by Larry Hardesty | MIT News
A new system that took a couple hours to decipher much of the ancient language Ugaritic could help improve online translation software...
by Auger-loizeau and Alex Zivanovic | Material Beliefs
The folks at Material Beliefs are still at it: carnivorous robots that eat flies, spiders and mice to generate self-perpetuating fuel!
by Mike Szczys | Hack A Day
TI wants to jump into the hobbyist microcontroller development market. And to start it off with a bang, they want to sell their first board for $4.30 each!
I haven't tried one, yet, but for $4.30, it's worth a glance.
by Information Pioneers | Vimeo
Video: Kate Russell presents Alan Turing, who, amongst his many innovations in the world of computer science, also had the vision to give us the basis of artificial intelligence...
by James Urquhart | NewScientist
To add to the robots that can crawl over land, fly through air and swim underwater comes one that can swim through sand. Such robots could help find people trapped in the loose debris resulting from an earthquake...
by ScienceDaily | ScienceDaily
Researchers at Oregon State University have made an important fundamental advance in robotics, in work that should lead toward robots that not only can walk and run effectively, but use little energy in the process...
by Courtney Boyd Myers | Forbes.com
The 10 most humanoid robots, and some others...
by David Gelernter | Forbes.com
...AI research has more or less shut down because it ignored an all-important detail: Intelligence isn't just about problem-solving, but about a whole cognitive spectrum that includes dreaming and other forms of unconscious activity...
by Jacob Aron | NewScientist
When Wade posted his self-replicating mathematical organism on a Life community website on 18 May, it sparked a wave of excitement. "This is truly ground-breaking work," wrote a fellow Life enthusiast, Adam Goucher, on the website Game of Life News. "In fact, this is arguably the single most impressive and important pattern ever devised..."
by Paul Marks | NewScientist
Alternate the voltages applied to each polymer muscle and the contractions will make the airship sway like a fish. Put some more membranes either side of its hinged tail, and it can swish it back and forth...
by Christopher Mims | MIT Technology Review
It's called the Arizona Financial Text system, or AZFinText, and it works by ingesting large quantities of financial news stories (in initial tests, from Yahoo Finance) along with minute-by-minute stock price data, and then using the former to figure out how to predict the latter...
by Lin Edwards | PhysOrg.com
Scientists at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) have developed a prototype surveillance camera and computer system to analyze the camera images and deliver a text feed describing what the camera is seeing...
by Robert Massey | PhysOrg.com
Scientists at University College London and the University of Cambridge have developed machine-learning codes modelled on the human brain that can be used to classify galaxies accurately and efficiently...
by Tom Simonite | NewScientist Magazine
MakerBot is one of a range of desktop manufacturing plants being developed by researchers and hobbyists around the world. Their goal is to create a machine that is able to fix itself and, ultimately, to replicate...
by Gregory Mone | Popular Science
With one in 110 children diagnosed with autism, and therapists in short supply, researchers are developing humanoids to fill the gaps...
by La Monica Everett-Haynes | UANews
Ian Fasel, an assistant research professor, recently received two grants to fund research and design projects toward creating highly intelligent robots...
by Christopher Mims | MIT Technology Review
The students used a convolutional network to "learn" features, such as tempo and harmony, from a database of songs that spread across 10 genres. The result was a set of trained neural networks that could correctly identify the genre of a song...
A new facial recognition system at the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles led to the arrest of a convicted forger as he tried to establish a sixth fake identity just months after his parole...
by Eliot Van Buskirk | Wired
If there is one thing computers do well, it's math. All of music's raw components — key, mode, melody, harmony and rhythm — can be expressed mathematically. As a result, computers can help people make music..
by Arnold Kim | MacRumors.com
During tonight's All Things D Interview with Steve Jobs, Walt Mossberg asked about Apple's intentions of getting into the search space and possibly competing with Google...
by ScienceDaily | ScienceDaily
The Virtual Manufacturing Automation Competition (VMAC) and the Mobile Microrobotics Challenge (MMC) -- were designed to prove the viability of advanced technologies for robotic automation of manufacturing and microrobotics...
by Duncan Graham-Rowe | MIT Technology Review
New software system, called KarDo, was developed by researchers at MIT. It can automatically configure an e-mail account, install a virus scanner, or set up access to a virtual private network...
by Sam Dean | OStatic
...one of the more interesting new open source robots is Qbo, a Linux-based robot from the folks at thecorpora.com...
by Chris Wilson | Slate
A computer program is writing great, original works of classical music. Will human composers soon be obsolete?
Modeled after the elephant's mighty trunk, this arm possesses great dexterity, flexibility and strength; operating with smooth, yet firm motions, and can pick up and move any kind of object from one place to another...
by Times Colonist | Times Colonist
Cybernetics experts predict that by 2020, most homes will have at least one live-in robot to help with the housework. A few crude models are already making an appearance...
by Corey Binns | Popular Science
At 245 pounds, Japan's Twendy-One is sturdy enough to lift its elderly patients clear off the ground, and force sensors in its fingertips and humanlike joints mean it can do it without crushing them...
by Western Kentucky University | Western Kentucky University
Students at the Artificial Intelligence Lab this semester will be getting first-hand robots experience in the robotics industry. The Center for Research and Development and Smart Robots, Inc., have teamed up to provide 14 functional robots for the lab...
by Mark Ward | BBC News
Older article from 2007, but still interesting:
Online worlds such as Second Life will soon become training grounds for artificial intelligences...
by Jason Palmer | BBC News
Roboticists say the swarms of robots could prove more adaptable and smarter than individual, self-contained ones...
by Donald Melanson | Engadget
CHARLI is actually a series of robots that initially consists of the 5-foot tall CHARLI-L, and the forthcoming CHARLI-H, both of which are completely autonomous, with a full range of movements and gestures...
by Susana Polo | Geekosystem
Video demonstrations of Boston Dynamics' LittleDog adeptly navigating obstacles.
by Priya Ganapati | Wired.com
Robotics company Willow Garage is giving 10 of its robots free to researchers in return for a promise that they will share their development efforts with the open-source community...
by Priya Ganapati | Wired.com
Robots have replaced humans on assembly lines, battlefields, space missions and rescue operations. Now how about doing something useful, like sitting through endless meetings for you?
by PhysOrg.com | PhysOrg.com
The article's a year old, but still interesting.
European researchers in robotics, psychology and cognitive sciences have developed a robot that can predict the intentions of its human partner. This ability to anticipate (or question) actions could make human-robot interactions more natural...
by Greg Fish | Discovery News
We can't give machines intelligence until we can figure out what roles creativity, inspiration and curiosity should play...
by Paul Marks | NewScientist
Pressure-sensing skins, smarter limbs and even bemused facial expressions. All these features will be needed to make future humanoid robots safe enough to hang out with humans in our homes, a symposium on humanoid robotics at the Institution of Engineering and Technology in London heard this week...
by Vijaysree Venkatraman | NewScientist
A robotic Venus Flytrap is one of the popups.
The Electronic Popable book, developed by the High-Low Tech group at the MIT Media Lab in Cambridge, has electronic circuitry embedded in its pages that transforms the tabs, flaps and wheels of a traditional pop-up into switches and a variety of sensors...
by Wilson Rothman | Gizmodo
Call it what you want, but the MIT-built horticultural robots roll around, lowering a tube and spraying right into dirt around the plants' stems...
by Larry Hardesty | PhysOrg.com
Today, computers can't reliably identify the objects in digital images. But if they could, they could comb through hours of video for the two or three minutes that a viewer might be interested in, or perform web searches where the search term was an image, not a sequence of words...
by Larry Hardesty | PhysOrg.com
Researchers at MIT, working with colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles, have developed new techniques that should make object recognition systems much easier to build and should enable them use computer memory more efficiently...
by Evan Ackerman | BotJunkie
Video: UPenn's Kodlab takes one of their RHex robots out to Mojave desert for training...
by Adam Hadhazy | Space.com
The controversy over canning NASA's Constellation program to send astronauts back to the moon in 2020 for investment in future robotic exploration came to The Colbert Report on Comedy Central...
by ScienceDaily | ScienceDaily
A multidisciplinary team at the University of Reading has developed a robot which is controlled by a biological brain formed from cultured neurons...
by ScienceDaily | ScienceDaily
BabyBot, a robot modeled on the torso of a two year-old child, is helping researchers take the first, tottering steps towards understanding human perception, and could lead to the development of machines that can perceive and interact with their environment...
by ScienceDaily | ScienceDaily
European researchers developed technology that enables a robot to combine data from both sound and vision to create combined, purposeful perception. In the process, they have taken the field to a new level...
by BBC News | BBC News
A future in which robots help around the home could prove harmful to humans, suggests a study. German researchers studied what happens in accidents involving robots using sharp tools alongside humans...
by Kevin Mayhood | MediLexicon
Studies have indicated that insects rely on their brains to respond to what they feel and see. But for the first time, researchers have shown a direct link between neurons at the center of an insect brain and changes in behavior...
by Ken Denmead | Wired
The X PRIZE Foundation, Google Inc., LEGO Systems, National Instruments, and Wired's GeekDad will announce "MoonBots: A Google Lunar X PRIZE LEGO(r) MINDSTORMS(r) Challenge" today at the FIRST WORLD Championships...
by Paul Marks | NewScientist
BEAUTY may be only skin deep, but for humanoid robots a fleshy covering is about more than mere aesthetics, it could be essential to making them socially acceptable. A touch-sensitive coating could prevent such machines from accidentally injuring anybody within their reach...
by nationalroboticsweek.org | nationalroboticsweek.org
Oops! This one slipped right past me.
by Joe Bibby | NASA
NASA will launch the first human-like robot to space later this year to become a permanent resident of the International Space Station. Robonaut 2, or R2, was developed jointly by NASA and General Motors under a cooperative agreement to develop a robotic assistant that can work alongside humans, whether they are astronauts in space or workers at GM manufacturing plants on Earth...
by Priya Ganapati | Wired
A bionic eye prototype developed by researchers in Australia aims to implant an array of electrodes in the eye that can deliver electrical impulses directly to neurons in the retina...
by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | MIT News
A new approach unites two prevailing but often opposed strains in the history of artificial-intelligence research...
by Paul Marks | NewScientist
"Dressing up Roomba happens in many ways," Sung says. People also often gave their robots a name and gender, according to the survey...
by Guy Webster | www.nasa.gov
NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, now in its seventh year on Mars, has a new capability to make its own choices about whether to make additional observations of rocks that it spots on arrival at a new location...
by Jessica Griggs | NewScientist
Can literary criticism ever be considered a science? Perhaps computer programs that can read and interpret literature will provide the answer, an idea that Jon Adams has been exploring...
by Christina Lent | The Beaverton Valley Times
Eighth-grader Arushi Raghuvanshi shares her knowledge at Norway symposium...
by Greg Fish | Discovery News
We can't give machines intelligence until we can figure out what roles creativity, inspiration and curiosity should play...
A four-part series: When will computers become more human? Part 4, The Evolution of Biological Computing, From Two Bits to Quantum and Neuromorphic Computing, and From Deep Blue to Blue Gene and Beyond.
A four-part series of articles: Laying the Foundation for the 21st Century, Fabbing and Mass Customization in the 21st Century, Machines that Give Birth to Other Machines, Here Come the Robots, The Human-Machine Interface
by Dan Stober | PhysOrg.com
I grew up in Colorado Springs, CO., where the Pikes Peak Hill Climb race has always been a big event. This is grueling and treacherous terrain, that taxes the best of human drivers. Personally, I think DARPA's Grand Challenge race courses were child's play compared to the PPHC! -- John McCullock
Ben Taskar is teaching computers how to watch television. Not, as you may think, because they need to relax after reading all that code, but because through this research, Taskar, the Magerman Term Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer and Information Science, is taking machine learning to the next level...
A robot powered by a computerized model of a rodent brain will help researchers from UC Irvine and UC San Diego understand how people recognize and adapt to change...
by Colin Barras | NewScientist
Using their flippers, the mechanical penguins can paddle through water just like real ones, while larger helium-filled designs can "swim" through the air...
by David Kushner | Discovery Magazine
Using computer processors that behave like neurons in the neocortex, Henry Markram is inching closer to building a simulated human brain—a truly conscious machine...
by Haomiao Huang | Ars Technica
A future full of helpful robots, quietly going about their business and assisting humans in thousands of small ways, is one of technology's most long-deferred promises. Only recently have robots started to achieve the kind of sophistication and ubiquity that computing's pioneers originally envisioned...
by Eric Bland | Discovery News
A new computer program developed by doctors could not only detect victims of abuse, but also may eventually be used to diagnose a variety of diseases and conditions...
by Sharon Gaudin | ComputerWorld
NASA officials said this week that robots are an essential part of the space shuttle Endeavour's key mission to install two new pieces of the International Space Station...
by Hadley Leggett | Wired
While Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity get all the press, there's another intrepid robot venturing where human scientists can't: The Benthic Rover, a robot that crawls along the ocean floor, has just completed its first month-long mission.
by Ben Hirschler | Reuters
Old news, but still very interesting:
Two teams of researchers said on Thursday (April 2, 2009) they had created machines that could reason, formulate theories and discover scientific knowledge on their own, marking a major advance in the field of artificial intelligence...
by Julie Steenhuysen | Reuters
U.S. researchers have developed tiny nanoparticle robots that can travel through a patient's blood and into tumors where they deliver a therapy that turns off an important cancer gene.
by NewScientist | NewScientist
Machines could soon be able to read people's facial expressions, no matter how subtle they are...
by Jason Striegel | Make Magazine
A genetic algorithm provides a simple way to search for an approximately optimal solution for an otherwise difficult and complex problem. By simulating the process of evolution, random mutation, breeding and selective pressure, a program can evolve a solution to a problem...
by IBNLive | IBNLive
When it comes to robots, we know they're clever at doing things - but what about machines that can think and feel for themselves?
by Emil Venere and William Crossley | Purdue
Some Earth-orbiting satellites will be able to keep in touch longer with controllers on the planet's surface thanks to computer programs that mimic Darwin's evolutionary model of survival-of-the-fittest.
by ScienceDaily | ScienceDaily
Intelligent machines that not only think for themselves but also actively learn are the vision of researchers of the Institute for Theoretical Science (IGI) at Graz University of Technology...
by PhysOrg.com | PhysOrg.com
Humanoid robots have been used to show that that functional hierarchy in the brain is linked to time as well as space. Researchers from RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Japan, have created a new type of neural network model...
by Paul Marks | NewScientist
Invest 10 million euro in a robotic octopus and you will be able to search the seabed with the same dexterity as the real eight-legged cephalopod. At least that's the plan, say those who are attempting to build a robot with arms that work in the same way that octopuses tentacles do...
by Anne Trafton | MIT News
Now, in an advance that may impact the field of artificial intelligence, a new model developed at MIT can help computers recognize patterns the same way that humans do. The model, reported earlier this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, can analyze a set of data and figure out which type of organizational structure best fits it...
by Jonathan Salem Baskin | InformationWeek
Machines have started making independent scientific discoveries, according to two reports made public a few weeks ago, perhaps heralding the start of true artificial intelligence. I think machines need to be dumb before they can ever be smart...
by Thomas Claburn | InformationWeek
At Google's Searchology event last month, VP of engineering Ubi Manber said that the current challenge in search is understanding people. Google doesn't understand yet, but he said the company is off to a good start...
by W. David Gardner | InformationWeek
It's taken a long time, but British Prime Minister Gordon Brown on Friday issued a posthumous apology for the government's "inhumane" treatment of gay mathematician Alan Turing, the computing pioneer who famously broke Nazi codes and also laid the groundwork for much of modern computing...
by Bobbie Johnson | guardian.co.uk
...after a string of headlines that labelled the machine a "corpse eater" and "creepy", the robot's creators have gone on a PR offensive to extinguish the rumour that their invention will feed on human or animal flesh...
A Swedish company has been fined 25,000 kronor ($3,000) after a malfunctioning robot attacked and almost killed one of its workers at a factory north of Stockholm.
by Josh Fischman | National Geographic
Amanda Kitts and others receive the latest in prosthetic technology. A robotic arm controlled by residual nerve endings of the amputee. Otic electrode implants help a child to hear. Optic implant helps a woman to see.
by Linda Rodriguez | Mental Floss Magazine
They're a lot like Robocop – except instead of patrolling the mean streets of Detroit in a fictional future, they could be patrolling the mean waters of the Thames...
by NewScientist | NewScientist
This robot is designed to explore the ways that babies learn to crawl...
by Jonathon Keats | Popular Science Magazine
Watson evolved out of IBM's DeepQA research on natural-language processing, a means of digitally parsing the information in human communication. Jeopardy is a great way to hone this technology...
by Larry Greenemeier | Scientific American Magazine
The European Research Council opens up its checkbook to fund Marco Dorigo's latest efforts to get networks and robots to mimic the highly efficient behavior of ant and other colony insects...
by Michael Brooks | NewScientist
In December, philosopher and artificial intelligence expert Aaron Sloman announced his intention to create nothing less than a robot mathematician...
by NewScientist | NewScientist
The idea that robots might one day be able to tell friend from foe is deeply flawed, says roboticist Noel Sharkey of the University of Sheffield in the UK...
by Paul Marks | NewScientist
A robot that can play with a yo-yo in the dark may sound as useful as a chocolate teapot, but it could be an important step towards creating highly mobile, low-cost robots...
by Priya Ganapati | Wired.com
Imagine a computer that can process text, video and audio in an instant, solve problems on the fly, and do it all while consuming just 10 watts of power.
It would be the ultimate computing machine if it were built with silicon instead of human nerve cells...
by Brandon Keim | Wired.com
An ancient script that's defied generations of archaeologists has yielded some of its secrets to artificially intelligent computers.
Computational analysis of symbols used 4,000 years ago by...
by Dave Demerjian | Wired.com
A British company is working on an artificial intelligence system that examines clouds to find areas in the sky where rising air creates the lift that allows gliders to sustain flight and powered aircraft to prolong their journeys...
by NewScientist | NewScientist
It's not just humans who find it difficult to run on sand. Even the most nimble robots struggle when faced with a stretch of the white stuff.
Planetary rovers and earthbound rescue robots often need to travel across varying terrain, including sand and rubble...
by Paul Marks | NewScientist Magazine
If we're ever going to build complex humanoid robots or sophisticated prosthetics, they'll need the ability to adapt to their changing circumstances.
Living creatures took millions of years to evolve from amphibians to four-legged mammals - with larger, more complex brains to match. Now an evolving robot has performed a similar trick in hours, thanks to a software "brain" that automatically grows in size and complexity as its physical body develops.
by Stephen Shankland | CNET News
Photo slideshow of Intel researchers' new robotic arm, wireless power trasmission, and more...
by By Kyle VanHemert | Gizmodo
A massive mechanical-architectural model with intricate detail -- all created with Lego components. Amazing. After all these years, I still don't think of Legos as toys.
by Robert McMillan | CIO
It seems like a question ripped from the back of a cheap sci-fi novel: What happens when the robots are turned against us?
But researchers at the University of Washington think it's finally time to start paying some serious attention to the question of robot security. Not because they think robots are about to go all Terminator on us, but because the robots can...
by Dario Floreano and Laurent Keller | PLoS Biology
Robots evolve to learn cooperation, hunting...
...the facility -- an Air Force research lab -- will join them into a parallel-computing cluster that, when complete, will number well over 2,000 PS3s...
by Gareth Branwyn | Make Magazine
YouTube video of Keanu Reeves doing a public service announcement for FIRST robotics.
by Paul Marks | NewScientist
Google's web services may be considered cutting edge, but they run in warehouses filled with conventional computers. Now the search giant has revealed it is investigating the use of quantum computers to...
by Alex Handy | SD Times
AI has been around since the early days of software development, but it is only recently that machine learning has begun to become a viable business tool. As such, a group of Apache Lucene developers decided...
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